In the soda aisle

In the grocery store yesterday I passed a dad holding his baby in the soda aisle, right between the ginger ale and the sparkling water. He stood there, babe in his arms, simply covering it with kisses. He wasn’t trying to cajole the baby or comfort it; instead it seemed as though his love was just so big, so overflowing that he couldn’t take another step without letting some of it spill out. It got me thinking about how there was a time when it probably wouldn’t have been OK for a father to feel that much delightful affection for their child, let alone show it in public. We often think about improving gender equality as something that will only benefit women, but clearly as the world has shifted to open up some public domains for women, it has also allowed men to shed private norms that have kept them separate from their whole selves. Emma Watson’s speech to the UN general assembly for her HeforShe campaign makes this argument movingly, but reminds us that we still have far to go.

There’s a parallel argument here which disability activists have been trying to make for years, but which I don’t think we’ve been able to make compellingly: increasing access and inclusion for people with disabilities isn’t simply good for people with disabilities, it’s good for people without them too. Opening up my world to a wider range of difference in others has meant that there’s more room for me to be me. It’s easier for me to accept and even love myself and all my differences when I get the chance to know and love others for theirs. When everyone belongs, I belong too.

The disability movement, with its push toward the concept of inclusion in schools, housing, the workplace and greater society, has made some inroads. As with the movement toward gender equality, we still have a long way to go. Until then, I’ll simply have to be grateful that I got to learn the lesson first hand long before it makes its way into the mainstream. Lucky me!

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About Cristin L.

Earthling, pilgrim, peace warrior and special needs parent
This entry was posted in special needs parenting and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to In the soda aisle

  1. HappyFamily says:

    Loving seeing moments like this. So sweet

  2. Carolyn Thompson says:

    So true, Cristin, and I think that once most non-disabled people truly get to know people with disabilities, they are less afraid of various conditions.

  3. dvanleeu17 says:

    Thanks, Cristin. Love hearing from you and yours. That window of kids (or grandkids) allowing (loving or tolerating) that display of infatuation is small indeed. Ain’t it grand, though?

  4. dvanleeu17 says:

    Reblogged this on Health Hats and commented:
    Cristin Lind ‘s Durga’s Toolbox is the best blog out there. Subscribe

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