Families pull up a chair to the table

After years of asking myself questions like “Why am I filling out this medical form when this information is already in their computer?” or “Why does this doctor only see patients during school hours?” and other such silly observations along the journey through parenting a child with special needs, I suddenly find myself invited by a couple of well-respected healthcare institutions to share my perspective with their staff and students.

It’s quite a responsibility to be given a seat at the table among pediatricians, speech/occupational/physical therapists, psychiatrists, practice managers, social workers and policy lawyers. I am so grateful to those family advocates and disability activists who have worked tirelessly to create a culture where a parent’s experience and opinion is valued and sought out. I hope I don’t let them down. I’m also acutely aware that I am speaking on behalf of the vast majority of parents of children with special needs who feel disenfranchised and powerless; due to either perceived or actual limitations, they don’t know how to speak their mind, share their story, or give their feedback to the professionals who hold the purse strings, create the laws, implement the therapies or design the communities that impact their families’ lives in very real ways. I hope I don’t let them down either.

On the heels of us parents pulling up a chair at the table, there’s another group beginning to claim their space here too—siblings of people with special needs. As the folks who will possibly spend even more of their own lives with their special family members than parents, sometimes as adult caregivers and guardians, they have a perspective to add to the conversation. Particularly amazing to me is how aware they are of the ways this experience has shaped them and helped them grow. Their very “boots on the ground” experience with a decidedly non-parental (read: less hysterical) perspective gives their experience credibility; I know I seek out their advice to help me create a family where both of my children can thrive and feel nurtured.

As sibling groups mobilize to create support groups and education like SibShops, conduct and share research, and build their own community within the Family Movement, I just have to say how glad I am that they are here.

They also just might be more effective at educating the very folks whose tables I’m sitting at these days than I am. In blogs, at fundraising events, on YouTube, in the media and on Capitol Hill, they are savvy and persistent.

Here’s a recent example, a short but remarkable video by a teenage sister of a boy with special needs. I can’t believe how lucky we parents are to be standing shoulder-to-shoulder with her:

Advertisements

About Cristin L.

Earthling, pilgrim, peace warrior and special needs parent
This entry was posted in special education, special needs parenting and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Families pull up a chair to the table

  1. Sarah says:

    Amazing!!! Good for her for standing up for her brother in that most amazing way and taking the time to write it all out!!! Everyone deserves a voice and an advocate like her!!!

    • I thought it was really amazing to watch the expressions on her face as she read each word herself before turning it to the camera. Her willingness to shoulder such pain in order to educate others is really amazing. And who says teens these days are driven to distraction by all this technology? From the looks of it, it just might be one of the things that save us.

  2. Debra says:

    Thanks for sharing this. What a beautiful example of “voice, brilliance, power”.

    The special needs community is lucky to have her and you among its voices!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s